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Despite our relative wealth here in the U.S., hunger is a vexing problem in our nation even in the best of times. And with the Covid crisis surging, this year has certainly been no exception. People have been hit hard–but thankfully, Californians have responded, pulling together to make sure the neediest among us don't go without.

The sheer number of initiatives is beyond impressive: from a teenager that raised $10,000 to benefit the hungry to an Encinita farm stand offering pay-what-you-can produce to those in need, people across the Golden State have stepped up to feed their neighbors this year.

This week, Patch.com showcased the vital work being done across California, in an exhaustiv...

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Food access is something that is so fundamental, people don't generally see it until it disappears. For those in economically sound communities, it's usually taken for granted. But our inner cities historically fall short on this measure, and "food deserts"–places where it can be difficult or impossible to find any fresh food–have become an unfortunate staple of many of our urban centers.

Olympia Auset is one person who wasn't ready to settle for that. Determined to help her community do better, the Howard University graduate and native of South Central Los Angeles launched the pop-up grocery concept SÜPRMARKT back in 2016.

"I would be on the bus two hours every time I needed ...

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We've all learned a great deal over the past eight months, and there has been a sharp learning curve in one area in particular: hunger. As Chef José Andrés explains in yesterday's editorial, this is an area where improvements are far overdue.

Andrés points out that our medical system wasn't truly modernized until after the 1914 epidemic, when it became clear that the old system wasn't up to the changing needs of the nation. In order to tackle our bigger food crisis, the same comprehensive overhaul is needed, he argues: "We need to think even bigger," Andrés says. "We need food policy action across the federal government, including the departments of agriculture, st...

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Like so many businesses, theaters have been hit hard since the beginning of the pandemic, and Oakland's New Parkway Theater was no exception. But while their screens are still dark, what the eight-year-old theater did have was a loyal following--and as they soon found out, that proved to be their saving grace.

Two weeks after the state shutdown, The New Parkway pivoted to a pickup and delivery food program. And the results have been surprising: while selling food hasn’t come close to replacing revenue lost from showing films, the business is surviving and moving forward.

“It’s fair to say it was an instant hit,” says Carlos Courtade of New Parkway, who sees the theater ...

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