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We all face adversity in life, and it's often said that the way one deals with these challenges is what truly defines a person. Colin Kaepernick is a good example of this: the pro quarterback has been sidelined now for three seasons, after controversy surrounding his decision to "take a knee" during the national anthem to protest police violence. But Kaepernick isn't letting the NFL slow him down–far from it.

Along with his Know Your Rights Camp Foundation, this past Sunday, Kap spent his 32nd birthday helping to feed the homeless in Oakland, CA. He and his group handed out backpacks filled with snacks, along with personal items like socks and soap. And this isn't the first time the foo...

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In a nation of just under 50 million, fully 3 million Kenyan kids are classified as orphans, and many of those are street children. It's a crisis of daunting proportions–but one crafty and compassionate organization has struck on what may be the perfect solution.

The people who run Agape Children’s Ministry started with one fundamental observation: the majority of Kenyan orphans actually have living relatives. Armed with that insight, the org's mission became to reunite as many of those kids with their families as possible. To date they have helped over 2,300 kids rejoin their families, and they've begun sharing their model with other outfits that hope to employ it elsewhere.

To he...

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Though it's something that most of us rarely think about, water is easily the most vital resource that we have on this planet. Sadly, people are so accustomed to having easy, cheap access to clean running water that they end up taking it for granted.

In reality, water is a resource in dire need of protection. America's water processing infrastructure is badly aging, and in need of a wholesale upgrade. To call attention to this problem, five years ago the people at The Value of Water created Imagine a Day Without Water, which was celebrated this year on October 23rd. The org uses the annual event to raise awareness, and to urge people to consider how even a single day without water would affec...

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For many people, a proper shower is often a luxury. And that doesn't just apply to the homeless; there are droves of other people who live without access to proper bathing facilities. Case in point: the 'Anchor-Outs' of Richardson Bay. The term refers to people who live and work on boats in the Bay, which abuts Sausalito and Marin County. Hundreds of people who didn't have regular access to showers--until now.

The people at Marin Mobile Care saw a need, and they've taken steps to address it. Recently, Sausalito became the third city to offer free showers through MMC, joining nearby cities of Novato and San Rafael. From all indications, the program is a great success--and the effect on the par...

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In 2014, Bill McKibben received the Right Livelihood Prize, often referred to as the ‘alternative Nobel.’ His book The End of Nature, written thirty years ago, is considered the first mainstream book about climate change. McKibben is the founder of 350.org, a climate change movement that has organized climate rallies in nearly every nation in the world, and was instrumental in launching the fossil fuel divestment movement.

In McKibben's new book Falter, he addresses the sheer magnitude of the losses we face due to climate change. He argues that our climate crisis threatens what he calls the human game: culture, politics, religion, and social life, the sum total of what we have cr...

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When Cheryl Gray initially heard about the new program, she thought it must be too good to be true. A nonprofit organization was planning on awarding 20 African American single mothers $1,000 each month for a year, provided they lived in public housing. The women would be allowed to use the money however they wanted.

Gray immediately signed on to the program, called Springboard to Opportunities, planning on using the money to pay for graduate school. But she quickly learned it wasn't quite that simple. Like the other women in the program, Gray had little to no experience with managing savings. She could stretch a minimum-wage paycheck, but had little experience with discretionary income.

It se...

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Unless you work in the world of NGOs, you've probably never heard of Bangladesh's BRAC. But don't let that mislead you: the organization has close to 100,000 full-time staff, 8,000 working outside of of their home country. And in the last year alone, BRAC worked to educate more than a million children, and lent money to nearly eight million striving people.

One of the world's most highly rated charities, BRAC works across a host of categories: they've invested in a university, a bank, a seed company--even a chain of boutiques. And as a hybrid of charitable programs and businesses, BRAC uses their profitable operations to subsidize the remainder of the org. But as Afghanistan changes, their go...

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As a youngster growing up in California's Salinas Valley, Fabiola Moreno Ruelas dealt with more than her share of hardship. She saw her father deported, and her family routinely struggled with housing and basic needs, at one point facing eviction.

Fortune is fickle however, and Fabiola received $29,000 on her 18th birthday as part of an injury settlement. But when the young student started to thinking of how to spend the money, she realized it shouldn't be on herself. Fabiola set up a scholarship program instead, naming it after her mother: the Ruelas Family Scholarship. Once Fabiola had ironed out the details, applications poured in, and Fabiola awarded her first scholarships to four student...

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When Annabelle Gurwitch decided to open her house to a homeless couple as part of her work with Safe Place for Youth, she didn't know what to expect. The author had been intrigued when she initially heard about their Host Home Program, which focuses on providing short-term “interventions” for young homeless adults. Wanting to "walk the walk" of her principles, she took the plunge--and the reality of opening her living space to strangers was both enervating and eye-opening.

In the end, Gurwitch's experience was an overwhelmingly positive one. And the Host Home model has shown great promise, both for curbing youth homelessness and changing public attitudes about the problem. And ...

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In 2018, Nigeria overtook India as the nation with the largest population living in extreme poverty. Among the many problems the rapidly growing country faces is energy security: the country's power grid has failed half a dozen times already in 2019.

Ugwem I. Eneyo grew up in Andoni in the Niger Delta, and she is the founder and CEO of SHYFT Power Solutions, an energy tech firm that develops technology solutions to optimize energy "grid reliability and resiliency.” And despite the steep slope women of color must negotiate to raise VC money, her company is making real progress.

To read more about Eneyo and SHYFT's breakthrough technology, read the recent Forbes article.