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If there is one thing that has become clear over the last several weeks, it's that we are all in this together. And as we often see in times of duress, people all over have been showing the better angels of their nature, and extending a helping hand to others in need.

The stories come from all walks of life: there is the Minnesota State Trooper who pulled a doctor over for speeding--but rather than giving him a ticket, gave the doc his stockpile of protective masks instead. Then there is the CEO who sacrificed his bonus and base salary so his company's workers would continue to get paid during the coronavirus pandemic. These are just two of the many stories demonstrating people's willingness ...

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When Felecia Gaston founded Performing Stars of Marin in 1990, a nonprofit art academy serving the underprivileged, she began with no budget whatsoever. “I had no idea about fundraising, writing grants, doing all the networking, filling out the 501(c)(3)s,” Gaston says.

Fast-forward 30 years, and today more than 3,000 young people have attended the program--and many have gone on to achieve at a level they never thought possible. By making classes, scholarships and other assistance accessible to families unable to afford performing arts programs, Gaston opened up a new world to kids who otherwise may have never had the chance to participate in the arts.

One excellent example is John...

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As we and our families struggle to accustom ourselves to the COVID-19 pandemic and all the ways it's impacting our daily lives, it's important to remember to stay as informed as possible. There is a lot of conflicting information out there, and a new interview from Salon with Dr. Timothy Brewer, of UCLA's Fielding School of Public Health, helps sort fact from speculation.

The author points out that China's infection rate appears to be falling quickly--and that it's the way we respond to the crisis that will determine its ultimate severity. And crucially, he reminds us that compassion is part of any proper response to an outbreak of this kind. It's a timely read, and you can check it out here....

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After returning to work following the birth of her second child, Michele Liddle felt unfulfilled, and her work schedule was punishing. Liddle traveled sometimes three weeks a month, and still nursing, she was pumping breast milk to ship it home. Somehow, working while her kids slept, she managed to put together her dream company: The Perfect Granola. But Liddle's product wasn't the point: hunger was.

“We’ve never been about the granola," says Liddle. "We’re mission-first. The granola was something to sell to fuel my other ideas on how to fix hunger.”

And Liddle will evidently stop at nothing to fulfill that mission. She is part of the New York Farm-to-School Program, an...

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Most of us would be hard-pressed to remember what we were doing when we were four years old. Not Mikaila Ulmer: she was starting her own small business. After an unlikely inspiration--being stung by a bee--Mikaila had come to realize the vital role that bees play in the ecosystem. And almost eleven years later, her business, Me & The Bees Lemonade, has grown into a huge success.

Selling flaxseed lemonade sweetened with local honey (her grandmother's recipe), Mikaila donates a percentage of her profits to organizations fighting to save honeybees. And after introducing her lemonade on “Shark Tank”, Mikaila was able to secure a $60,000 investment to continue to grow her enterprise. T...

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When Devin Nakano of Boise was only three years old, he was diagnosed with Asperger's Syndrome. At the time, his mother was told that the chances of her son living a successful life were "slim to none."

Miraculously, today Nakano is the founder of Y Stem and Chess, a nonprofit dedicated to breaking the cycle of poverty by teaching at-risk kids chess, math and computer coding. Nakano has been at it since 2017, and is just getting started. “It builds critical thinking, it raises your IQ, it builds math scores," Nakano says. "It helps you communicate, it builds self-esteem, the list really goes on and on and on.”

To read more about this remarkably gifted educator, check out the recent...

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As nearly anyone can tell you, Valentine's Day can be a tricky holiday, especially when you're single. It's a difficult day to be alone, and one can just imagine how hard it would be to be in a homeless shelter on a day when others are celebrating.

With this in mind, this year the Sikh community in London is taking steps to ensure that women staying in shelters on Valentine’s Day aren't forgotten. Volunteers are assembling personal care packages, complete with baked treats and items like toothbrushes and shampoo, to be brought to local women’s shelters for the holiday this Friday.

The program, launched in 2012 by the One Billion Rising movement, now happens in a host of cities, inc...

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When it comes to public policy, there are some issues that tend to be portrayed as permanent, systemic, just "part of the landscape". Poverty often seems to be one of these, sadly. But this of course is an illusion: like all social conditions, poverty is the result of specific choices made by governments, businesses and other powerful institutions.

There may be no better illustration of this point than the story being told in Canada right now. In 2016, the Canadian government began giving parents a small amount of money — a few hundred dollars a month — to help subsidize the costs of child raising. The amounts are very modest, but the results have been enormous: in just one year, ...

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When he founded nonprofit TechnoServe just over a half-century ago, Ed Bullard espoused a point of view that was downright radical for the time. Namely, that profits and poverty abatement aren't antithetical, and that the two can actually support one another.

Of course, this perspective has become almost mainstream in today's business world. TechnoServe has expanded to 29 countries, connecting big corporations with small farmers to help them prosper and grow their businesses. And they're at the top of their game: Impact Matters, which rates nonprofits based on their impact, has rated TechnoServe as the number one nonprofit in cost effectiveness for reducing poverty.

And as TechnoServe CEO Will...

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As I write this, approximately 800 million women and girls in the world are menstruating. Despite the commonness of the occurrence, however, many are still forced to do so clandestinely, and in shame. Sadly, menstruation is in some ways the last great taboo, and that's no hyperbole: indeed, nearly half of women have no foreknowledge of the condition before their first menstrual cycle.

Thankfully, a groundbreaking new documentary is working to change all that: produced and directed by a predominantly female team, Pandora’s Box may be the first feature-length documentary film to focus on menstrual rights. The film zeroes in on the introduction of reusable pads, and puts a light on the wor...

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