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In 2014, Bill McKibben received the Right Livelihood Prize, often referred to as the ‘alternative Nobel.’ His book The End of Nature, written thirty years ago, is considered the first mainstream book about climate change. McKibben is the founder of 350.org, a climate change movement that has organized climate rallies in nearly every nation in the world, and was instrumental in launching the fossil fuel divestment movement.

In McKibben's new book Falter, he addresses the sheer magnitude of the losses we face due to climate change. He argues that our climate crisis threatens what he calls the human game: culture, politics, religion, and social life, the sum total of what we have cr...

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When Vandana Shiva was growing up in the wilds of the Himalaya, her father was a forest conservator, her mother a farmer. Her close relationship with nature was set early on, and her involvement with Chipko, a nonviolent org that emerged in response to large-scale deforestation in the region, soon put Shiva on the path to a career in ecology.

Today, at 66, Shiva has founded a biodiversity farm, Navdanya, as well as Earth University, a learning center that teaches students principles of biodiversity and what Shiva calls "Earth Democracy." Her commitment to farmers' rights and poison-free farming has earned Shiva a slew of awards and accolades, and she has been called an environmental hero by n...

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When Joelle Eyeson and her organization Hive Earth set out to address housing problems in Ghana, their goal was to provide structures that were both eco-friendly and affordable. For instance, building with cement is especially bad for air quality in Ghana's hot climate, so they came up with an alternative: their "rammed earth" technique combines laterite, clay and granite chips for a cheaper, more sustainable material that eliminates 95% of the toxic cement.

This is just one of the innovations they are incorporating into their homes to make them not just more sustainable, but more livable as well. They've also come up with a ventilation method that utilizes a solar pump, an arrangement that c...

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In the developing world, one of the most common problems is the expansion of food production to feed growing populations. Historically, the answer in many places has been to replace forests with agriculture. Currently, the practice is responsible for over seventy-five percent of global deforestation, according to the U.N.’s Food and Agriculture Organization.

But there are alternatives. A small West African nation of just over two million people, The Gambia is managing to both produce more food and grow more forests. And in the process, they are providing a valuable example for other developing countries around the world.

How are they doing it? Since 1990, the Gambian government has been ...

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Papua, New Guinea is a country of more than 8 million people, but most would be hard-pressed to point it out on a map. That isolation, caused by years of colonialism and exploitation, makes it very difficult for citizens to find markets for their products.

Thankfully, two New Zealand entrepreneurs have made it their mission to connect the country's producers of essential oils and spices with customers around the world. Tamati and Rebekah Norman also work to safeguard traditional and natural production methods in the country. The two created Native Rituals, a modern apothecary incorporating traditional Māori preparations, and they're the subject of a recent Business Is Boring podcast (which is...

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When Ken Jacobus quit his Silicon Valley job to set up Good Start Packaging in 2009, he had little knowledge of the packaging industry, and less than $10,000 in inventory. To make sure every dollar went as far as it possibly could, the entrepreneur did the only sensible thing: he did everything himself. He took on sales, admin, management and even the delivery of product.

Today, Jacobus' company is changing the way that restaurants handle packaging, and helping to create a new sustainable paradigm for the fast food industry. To find out how, read the brand-new Forbes article here.

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One of the most severe impacts of climate change is the scourge of drought. Drought affects rural farmers' ability to make a living and provide for themselves, and threatens the wider food supply. Solar stills have shown great promise as a way to insure fresh water supplies, but they are typically inefficient. Engineer and social entrepreneur Alessandro Bianciardi has been working on the problem, and has been making immense progress by looking at one of the greatest powers of nature itself: mimicry.

Bianciardi and his team have created what they call the 'Mangrove Still,' which, incredibly, can be produced at just 1/5 of the cost of traditional solar stills. You can read the whole fascinating...

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Plastic pollution is a growing problem in our oceans, and an issue that doesn't get nearly enough attention. Plastics are known to cause problems for numerous marine animals, including sea turtles, seals and seabirds to name just a few. Worse yet, aquatic microorganisms mistake plastic particles for food. It’s estimated that approximately 700 different marine species are threatened with extinction due to plastic waste.

One man is taking courageous steps to reverse this problem: Ben Lecomte. Lecomte, already acclaimed as the first man to swim across the Atlantic Ocean without a kickboard, plans to swim from Tokyo to San Francisco in just over a week. He has partnered with Seeker and Disc...

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