Blog

temp-post-image

The Covid-19 pandemic has had an unprecedented effect on business throughout the world, and it continues to transform the landscape of our daily lives. Thankfully, many entrepreneurs have taken this disruption as a rare opportunity to redirect their energy toward the public good.

Operation StaySafe is one good example: they're a coalition of the leading American medical testing companies, along with healthcare professionals and entrepreneurs, 22 companies in all. They are working to create realistic, scalable solutions to the testing problem, and to increase access to comprehensive testing. Not only is StaySafe creating rapid tests accessible at home and work, they go a step further to aggreg...

Read more

temp-post-image

When the alarm about Covid-19 went out months ago, Marialaura Osorio, 23, took it seriously. She was very careful, following a rigid set of rules and staying locked down at her Austin home. "I was literally the crazy one with this whole thing," she says. "And I'm the only one that got it."

The news of her diagnosis hit Osorio hard. "The first four days from getting my result it was just like, I was in bed having panic attacks," she says. "It was just horrible."

She was looking for hope – and she found it, in the form of an online support group for Covid survivors run by Andrey Khudyakov of Paris. Khudyakov's online community, which began as a way for him to stay in touch with family memb...

Read more

temp-post-image

It has now been nearly three months since widespread lockdowns went into effect across the world in response to the Covid virus. And though these measures have been a colossal disruption to both our lives and our economies, and many still bridle at the restrictions, two new studies show that they were anything but unnecessary. Indeed, they appear to have already saved literally millions of lives.

The studies, conducted by Imperial College London and University of California–Berkeley and published in Nature magazine, show the impact of emergency health measures across 17 different countries. According to Dr. Seth Flaxman, author of the Imperial College study, those measures have saved ov...

Read more

temp-post-image

The founder and CEO of Making Authentic Friendships (MAF), a web-based app that helps kids and adults with special needs to make friends, Juliana Fetherman has always had a uniquely strong motivating force: her younger brother Michael, who was diagnosed with autism and ADHD. Michael struggles with forming friendships, a common problem among those with his diagnosis.

Like many new entrepreneurs, Fetherman faced a steep learning curve when she started out. But she stuck with it, and MAF is currently serving the special needs community in 30 states, 12 countries and 5 continents – and all this from a 23-year-old with no prior business experience.

In the recent Forbes feature, the young entr...

Read more

temp-post-image

Of all the trends that have transformed business in the last couple of decades, the importance of data certainly tops the list. Major companies live or die by their data these days, so much so that it's now hard to imagine them doing business any other way.

Now the power of data aggregation is being used to address the exigencies and decision-making of the poorest members of society, rather than the most powerful. Poverty Stoplight is a self-evaluation tool that allows families to rank their economic state based on objective indicators, assigning each a value of red, yellow or green. This simple tool gives families the insight to help themselves--and perhaps just as importantly, it also give...

Read more

temp-post-image

In 2018, Nigeria overtook India as the nation with the largest population living in extreme poverty. Among the many problems the rapidly growing country faces is energy security: the country's power grid has failed half a dozen times already in 2019.

Ugwem I. Eneyo grew up in Andoni in the Niger Delta, and she is the founder and CEO of SHYFT Power Solutions, an energy tech firm that develops technology solutions to optimize energy "grid reliability and resiliency.” And despite the steep slope women of color must negotiate to raise VC money, her company is making real progress.

To read more about Eneyo and SHYFT's breakthrough technology, read the recent Forbes article.

temp-post-image

Ethiopia has made a lot of encouraging progress in recent years, but despite two decades of economic growth, its economy is still struggling. The nation has one of the world's lowest GDPs per capita, and many Ethiopians still rely on subsistence farming. 29-year old tech entrepreneur Selam Wondim is up to the challenges facing her home country, however. And recent changes on Ethiopia's political horizon, including the election of Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed, have her feeling optimistic.

These days, young Ethiopians are looking more and more to technology–and it's not in search of the latest food delivery app. Where much of new technology in the West is convenience-driven, in Ethiopia peop...

Read more

temp-post-image

In 2014, Subhajit Roy and Gargi Mazumdar competed in the Global Learning XPRIZE competition to promote learning using technology. They were shortlisted, and after the competition, they decided to quit their full-time jobs to create an enterprise version of their software that would benefit underprivileged students in rural India.

Krishworks has been busy, and they are aiming high: in just over a year, the startup has opened 14 locations across West Bengal, responsible for nearly 600 rural students being educated in spoken English. And they plan to open fully 50 centers there by next year. For more, check out the full Your Story feature.

temp-post-image

How does one go from a successful modeling career to working as a social entrepreneur learning high-end mobile development–all the while attending medical school?

Ask Shanay Thompson. After a successful stint in the modeling industry, motivated to help others, Thompson decided to become a doctor. When she got into Stanford University, she began mentoring at-risk teens, getting a taste for volunteerism. She then launched Every Kid Fed, a nonprofit which operates year-round pantries in schools in Oakland, California.

Today Thompson's group is feeding hundreds of students who would otherwise go hungry–and she's not finished. To hear the rest of her galvanizing tale, read the Forbes st...

Read more

temp-post-imageA remarkable new tool is being used to help families rank their own economic condition red, yellow or green based upon an array of indicators–and may be on its way to changing the microfinance game. Developed by social entrepreneur Martín Burt, who founded Fundación Paraguaya over three decades ago to promote economic empowerment in Paraguay, Poverty Stoplight is working to give families the tools they need to pull themselves out of poverty.

For more details on this impressive org, read the OZY article here.