Blog

temp-post-image

To say the very least, 2020 has been a uniquely challenging year for all of us. But as the pandemic drags on, people across America are working together with compassion to solve urgent problems in our food system.

Community-based and -supported agriculture has been soaring since the Covid-19 pandemic began, and it's a more-than-welcome silver lining. Our friends at Civil Eats have collected fully 20 stories about these inspiring changes: from the farmers in Puerto Rico who are working for climate resilience and social justice to the Navajo women who are exploring ways to increase food access, together they describe a food system struggling to change for the better.

To learn more, you can read ...

Read more

temp-post-image

When Tarrant Cross Child was suicidal and fighting addiction, running was his lifeline, making a critical difference when he had nothing else to reach for. Afraid of losing everything, Cross Child, who is Blackfoot from the southern Alberta Blood Tribe of Saskatchewan, used running as therapy to recover.

Today Cross Child works to bring that inspiration to kids in similar trouble, through his Prairie Run Crew Outreach Program. There is a serious youth suicide crisis among indigenous young people in Saskatchewan, and he is determined to make a difference. “I want these kids to experience a victory, something good,” Cross Child explains. “Something positive in their life that ...

Read more

temp-post-image

The concept of mutual aid is a simple one: in difficult times, we should all do what we can to help each other, whether we be friends or strangers. Chances are a lot of you have already seen one of the many spreadsheets out there, lists that compile the contact info of people who'd like to volunteer to help those in need.

A lot of resources have popped up just over the last few weeks alone. One mutual aid group started when Alli McGill, director of care at Washington DC's Table Church, sent out a simple tweet: “If you are in DC and are in the at-risk demographic and need errands run so you can limit exposure — will you email me?”

McGill was amazed when her message was retweet...

Read more

temp-post-image

As we head into the third week of April, most of us are still struggling to deal with the new realities of the Covid crisis. And while we are beginning to see some very hopeful signs in many parts of the country, we still have some difficult times ahead of us. And for now, people are hurting.

For the more fortunate among us, the question at times like this becomes: How do I help? There are stimulus checks going out to a lot of people who in reality are doing just fine--and that opens up a lot of opportunity for giving. And when it comes to volunteering, clearly people have more time on their hands than ever.

Thankfully, the people at Vox have taken the time to put together a helpful survey of ...

Read more

temp-post-image

If there is one thing that has become clear over the last several weeks, it's that we are all in this together. And as we often see in times of duress, people all over have been showing the better angels of their nature, and extending a helping hand to others in need.

The stories come from all walks of life: there is the Minnesota State Trooper who pulled a doctor over for speeding--but rather than giving him a ticket, gave the doc his stockpile of protective masks instead. Then there is the CEO who sacrificed his bonus and base salary so his company's workers would continue to get paid during the coronavirus pandemic. These are just two of the many stories demonstrating people's willingness ...

Read more

temp-post-image

When Devin Nakano of Boise was only three years old, he was diagnosed with Asperger's Syndrome. At the time, his mother was told that the chances of her son living a successful life were "slim to none."

Miraculously, today Nakano is the founder of Y Stem and Chess, a nonprofit dedicated to breaking the cycle of poverty by teaching at-risk kids chess, math and computer coding. Nakano has been at it since 2017, and is just getting started. “It builds critical thinking, it raises your IQ, it builds math scores," Nakano says. "It helps you communicate, it builds self-esteem, the list really goes on and on and on.”

To read more about this remarkably gifted educator, check out the recent...

Read more

temp-post-image

We all face adversity in life, and it's often said that the way one deals with these challenges is what truly defines a person. Colin Kaepernick is a good example of this: the pro quarterback has been sidelined now for three seasons, after controversy surrounding his decision to "take a knee" during the national anthem to protest police violence. But Kaepernick isn't letting the NFL slow him down–far from it.

Along with his Know Your Rights Camp Foundation, this past Sunday, Kap spent his 32nd birthday helping to feed the homeless in Oakland, CA. He and his group handed out backpacks filled with snacks, along with personal items like socks and soap. And this isn't the first time the foo...

Read more
temp-post-image

When Annabelle Gurwitch decided to open her house to a homeless couple as part of her work with Safe Place for Youth, she didn't know what to expect. The author had been intrigued when she initially heard about their Host Home Program, which focuses on providing short-term “interventions” for young homeless adults. Wanting to "walk the walk" of her principles, she took the plunge--and the reality of opening her living space to strangers was both enervating and eye-opening.

In the end, Gurwitch's experience was an overwhelmingly positive one. And the Host Home model has shown great promise, both for curbing youth homelessness and changing public attitudes about the problem. And ...

Read more

temp-post-image

When Mohan Sudabattula was volunteering in the prosthetic department of a Utah hospital, he noticed that medical rehab equipment like crutches and wheelchairs tended to have a short life: that is, it was typically used by one person, then thrown away.

This experience became the impetus behind Project Embrace, Sudabattula's nonprofit organization. Today, the 23-year-old student and his team of volunteers scour the shelves of thrift stores and other sources, and receive personal donations from the community. They refurbish the gear, then send it to medical facilities around the world where it can be used again.

To hear more about this remarkable young world-changer, read the feature article.

temp-post-image

Just before her seventh birthday, Jenny Shaw was diagnosed with kidney cancer. The doctors told her and her stricken parents that the tumor had metastasized to Jenny's liver, and would require chemotherapy, radiation and surgery.

Such a bleak diagnosis might be expected to devastate a child so young, but Jenny's reaction was very different. The first thing she wanted to do, remarkably, was help other kids in the same situation. Jenny's simple idea was to provide the comforts of home to those enduring long-term hospital stays. It might just be a blanket or a favorite toy, but these small items that we take for granted can make all the difference to a kid forced to stay away from home.

Jenny cre...

Read more