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Born in a small fishing village in Senegal, Magatte Wade left her home country as a girl to live with her parents in France. Just old enough to see the differences between Senegal and France, Wade found herself puzzled.

As Wade got older, she began to notice a pattern: in wealthier nations, it was much easier for people to start a business than it was in poorer nations like Senegal. Since more business means more opportunities for everyone, she asked herself: could the key be encouragement of entrepreneurship?

Wade knew that in her hometown, there were few opportunities to break out of poverty. She came to see that the best way for her to change the situation at home would be to do it herself&...

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When Cheryl Gray initially heard about the new program, she thought it must be too good to be true. A nonprofit organization was planning on awarding 20 African American single mothers $1,000 each month for a year, provided they lived in public housing. The women would be allowed to use the money however they wanted.

Gray immediately signed on to the program, called Springboard to Opportunities, planning on using the money to pay for graduate school. But she quickly learned it wasn't quite that simple. Like the other women in the program, Gray had little to no experience with managing savings. She could stretch a minimum-wage paycheck, but had little experience with discretionary income.

It se...

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When she was just a second grader, Nujoud Merancy visited an air traffic control tower on a school field trip, an event that kindled the young girl's interest in aerospace; later, she was inspired by the Apollo missions. And incredibly, today she is working on an enormous mission of her own: sending the first woman to the moon by 2024.

Along with her colleagues Anne McClain and Holly Ridings, Merancy is part of a new vanguard of females in the aerospace industry. She serves as Exploration Mission Planning and Analysis lead for the Orion spacecraft that will execute the 2024 mission, and Ridings is NASA's first female Chief Flight Director; McClain just came back from a six-month assignment on...

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For all of the transformation we've seen in the world of venture capital in recent years, evidence suggests that old ideas persist. Unfortunately, barriers still pervade the space: current figures show that women CEOs net only 3 percent of venture capital, and black women CEOs get only 0.2 percent.

As a CEO in the tech sector, Elaine Kunda experienced a modicum of success. But when she left with plans to become an angel investor, she came to learn how hard it was for female entrepreneurs to get funded.

"It was weird," Kunda says. Many women "were way more competent, capable, and further along in their businesses" than comparable men pitching for VC funds, but were routinely passed over. Kunda ...

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A supermajority is defined as any vote that requires more than a simple majority in order to win approval, or any group making up more than one half of a population. In the America of 2019, at 50.8 percent, the female population qualifies as a supermajority–and it's one which wields a great deal of potential political power.

Yesterday, former Planned Parenthood President Cecile Richards announced that she is starting a new women’s political action group with Alicia Garza, cofounder of Black Lives Matter, and Ai-jen Poo, director of the National Domestic Workers Alliance.

The group, to be called Supermajority, will partner those organizations and others to train women on how to par...

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By any estimation, Twotone Grant had a difficult childhood. By the age of 12, Grant was living on the streets, and she spent nearly 8 years drifting in and out of homelessness. Her mother had severe issues with addiction and mental illness, and at times Grant felt like the streets of Los Angeles were the safest place for her to be.

Her harrowing experiences as a child left Grant with a profound sense of empathy for the poor, and when she saw a news story about a homeless man freezing to death, she was compelled to take action. She founded A Light in the Night Community Outreach, a nonprofit providing items like blankets and socks to the homeless people of Albuquerque.

“I want to make sur...

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Without question, working with homeless youth is not for the weak of heart. Remarkably, Deborah Shore has been doing it for forty-five years, in one of the nation's toughest urban markets: Washington D.C. Raised on union songs in Pittsburgh, PA, Shore began working with young people at the outset of her career, and has never looked back.

Today, Shore runs Sasha Bruce, a nonprofit which funds several shelters, health and wellness programs, and classes for homeless youth. Sasha Bruce is one of the oldest organizations of its kind in Washington, D.C., helping 250 to 300 young people a year.

How does one stay motivated in such a punishing, unforgiving line of work? For Shore, it's about realizing ...

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Ethiopia has made a lot of encouraging progress in recent years, but despite two decades of economic growth, its economy is still struggling. The nation has one of the world's lowest GDPs per capita, and many Ethiopians still rely on subsistence farming. 29-year old tech entrepreneur Selam Wondim is up to the challenges facing her home country, however. And recent changes on Ethiopia's political horizon, including the election of Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed, have her feeling optimistic.

These days, young Ethiopians are looking more and more to technology–and it's not in search of the latest food delivery app. Where much of new technology in the West is convenience-driven, in Ethiopia peop...

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